RE-EXAMINATION OF GENOCIDE: THE INADEQUACY OF LEGAL DEFINITION AND WEAKNESS OF INTERNATIONAL LAW

BY: DR BABALOLA ABEGUNDE

Abstract
When it comes to human rights as a whole, states and citizens have travelled vast distances. But one ugly, deadly and recurrent reality check persists: genocide. Genocide has occurred so often and so uncontested in the last fifty years that an epithet more apt in describing recent events that the often-chanted “Never Again” is in fact “Again and Again.” The gap between the promise and the practice of the last fifty years is dispiriting indeed. This paper examines genocide with respect to the etymology, definition, conceptual frame work, causes, statistics, jurisdiction to prosecute and weakness of international law. It round up with recommendations and concluding remarks The aim of this paper is to reawaken our consciousness to the ferocity of genocide and the need to avert it by being proactive. This is a desk-based research and it relies on both primary and secondary sources of data which have been subjected to contentual and contextual analysis. It is the findings of this author that the legal definition of genocide is too narrow for contemporary world coupled with other weaknesses of international law. The problem of genocide can therefore not be solved by means taken within the criminal justice sector alone.